The Irish Catholic Churches of Buckinghamshire, Devon, Dorchester, Hertford, plus the Seigniories of St. Giles & Beaurivage within present day counties of Beauce, Bellechasse, Dorchester, Lévis, Lotbinière.

 

From about 1815 to the 1960’s

 

Years in bracket indicate the year a church welcomed their first Irish families. Only the churches with an appreciable Irish presence were included into this research guide.

 

Compiled and researched by Jacques Gagné

Acknowledgement; Cecilia Karwowski, Head Librarian at the QFHS Library, without Cecilia's guidance, the following would have been impossible.

 

1832 Emigrants Handbook

for arrivals at Quebec

 

A.    C. Buchanan - Chief Agent. Emigrant Department,

Quebec, 1st June, 1832

Published by His Majestys Chief Agent for the superintendence of settlers and emigrants in Lower Canada

 

For the use of Emigrants (gratis)

 

Printed in Quebec by Thomas Cary & Co.

Freemasons Hall, Buade Street, Quebec 1832

 

Reproduced by Marjorie P. Kohli of the University of Waterloo from various sources

 http://ist.uwaterloo.ca~mark/genealogy/emigrants/1832.html

 

“1832 Emigrants Handbook for Arrivals in Quebec”

Information for emigrants

There is nothing of more importance to emigrants on arrival at Quebec, than correct information on the leading points, connected with their future pursuits. Many have suffered much by a want of caution, and by listening to the opinions of interested designing characters, who frequently offer their advice unsolicited, and who are met generally about wharves and landing places frequented by strangers. To guard emigrants from failing into such errors, they should immediately on arrival at Quebec, proceed to the

Office of the Chief Agents for Emigrants,

in Sault-au-Matelot street in Quebecs Lower Town.

 

Emigrants arriving at Quebec from the United Kingdom, and who are desirous of settling in Lower Canada, or of obtaining employment in Lower Canada, are informed that all necessary information for their guidance may be obtained (gratis) on application at this Office, between the hours of 10 and 3 oclock daily, Sundays excepted.

 

The following directions are of importance to the emigrant arriving in Canada, and are addressed to him in the simplest language.

 

Previous to disembarkation, arrange your baggage in a small compass, the fewer packages the better, but have them well secured. Old dirty clothing, large boxes, and other useless articles, are not worth the carriage. If you have any provisions left, such as oatmeal, potatoes, etc, you can sell them at Quebec at a profit, and avoid the expense of transport, and you can purchase bakers bread, butter, tea, sugar, and other necessaries more suited for your journey.

 

Persons intending to settle in Lower Canada, will find much valuable information regarding the laws and customs of the country by referring to a little work published by Joseph F. Perrault, Esquire, Prothonotary, of Lower Canada, entitled, “A Rural Code for the use of the old and new inhabitants of Lower Canada,” which may be had of Messrs. T. Cary & Co. Printers, at Quebec, for nine pence.

 

Routes to the principal settlements in

Lower Canada

·         District of Quebec

·         Townships of Portneuf North side of the River St. Lawrence and in the district and vicinity of Quebec, are the settlements of Beauport, Stoneham, Tewsbury, Valcartier and Jacques Cartier, Deschambault, and the settlement of Portneuf. Inhabitants, principally Irish.

·         Township of St. Nicholas From the Market-slip, in the Lower Town of Quebec, ferry-boats go daily as the tide suits, to St. Nicholas, 12 miles up the river on the south side, where Craigs Road begins.

·         Townships of Frampton - South side of the River St. Lawrence 36 miles from Quebec by Point Levy, a thriving settlement, inhabitants mostly Irish Townships lying contiguous to the Kennebec Road, beyond Frampton, offer good prospect for settlement. The lands are principally private property. The Seignioury of St. Giles, 30 miles from Quebec, by St. Nicholas and the Craigs Road, is favourably situated for emigrants, from its contiguity to the Capital, and is increasing rapidly, its population is principally Irish.

·         Township of New Argyle - Seigniory of St. Croix The settlement of New Argyle, located 8 miles from Richardsons Tavern, on the Craigs Road, in St. Giles, and 38 miles from Quebec; the new road to the Township of Inverness, passes through this settlement. Inhabitants, principally Highlanders from the Island of Islay, and Irish. The lands in this part are of good quality.

·         Townships of Ulster Yorkshire Dublin New Hamilton The settlements of Ulster, Yorkshire, Dublin, and New Hamilton, commence four miles beyond New Argyle, and 42 miles from Quebec, and are situated in the flourishing Township of Inverness, through which a new road has been nearly finished to the borders of the Township of Halifax. The inhabitants of Inverness are from various parts of the United Kingdom. Those from England are principally from Yorkshire, those from Ireland, mostly from the Northern Counties, and those from Scotland, are chiefly Highlanders from the Island of Arran. Beyond Inverness lie the Townships of Halifax, Chester, and Tingwick; good lands for settlement; but at present there is no convenient road to them. The Township of Arthabaska joins Inverness, and is a desirable place for settlement.

·         Township of Leeds The settlement of Leeds, through which Craigs Road passes, lies to the left of Inverness. The region is located 50 miles from Quebec, and is increasing rapidly in population. Inhabitants, Scotch, Irish and English.

·         Township of New Ireland The region of New Ireland, through which Craigs Road also passes, lies beyond Leeds, 60 miles from Quebec and is increasing much in population. The inhabitants are principally Irish, and a number of English of the Wesleyan connexion, also about 25 American families from the United States.

·         Townships of Shipton & Dudswell Craigs road leads to Shipton and Dudswell, but is impassable for wheel carriage transport beyond Ireland.

·         Eastern Townships of Lower Canada

·         The route to the Townships - The present route to Trois Rivières (Three Rivers), 90 miles above Québec , by steam-boat, here cross the St. Lawrence to the south side and proceed to Sherbrooke, by Nicolet, La Baie, and Drummondville, or you may proceed to Sorel, 40 miles above Trois Rivieres on the south side of the St. Lawrence, and there disembark; the rate of passage from Quebec by the steam-boat, will be a trifle more than it is to Trois-Rivieres, but you will avoid the ferry. A good road leads from Sorel to Sherbrooke, by Yamaska and Drummondville. The distance from Quebec to Sherbrooke in a straight line by the new road to Inverness, when finished is 99 miles, and by Trois Rivières or Sorel, the route obliged to be taken for transport, is 160 miles, of which 70 is land carriage

·         Townships of Sherbrooke Sherbrooke is the Capital of the Eastern Townships, and is surrounded by thriving settlements, particularly Stanstead, where industrious farming labourers or mechanics are much wanted, and are sure by good conduct to do well; as also, in the Townships of Stanbridge, Brome, Dunham, Potton and the Seigniory of St. Armand; the route to which is by St-Jean (St. Johns)

·         Townships of Chambly Chambly is 40 miles from Sorel and 18 from Montreal. Labourers may get employment at the canal now making at Chambly, Chateauguay, Godmanchester and Sherington, from 25 to 40 miles from Montreal, south side of the St. Lawrence, are thriving situations.

·         North Shore of the St. Lawrence in Lower Canada

·         Townships of Trois Rivières Three Rivers and its vicinity, 90 miles from Québec, give employment to many emigrants. In the rear of Berthier, 130 miles above Québec, are the Townships of Brandon, Kilkenny, Rawdon and Kildare.

·         Townships of New Glascow Settlements in the Seigniory of Terrebonne, is about 30 miles from Montréal. Persons bound for the townships bordering on the Ottawa River, particularly Lochaber, Templeton, Hull, Grenville, Horton or other situations, on the Ottawa River, can proceed from Montreal, and Lachine, by the usual conveyances. There are many desirable situations for settlement belonging to private individuals. The names of the proprietors or the agents may be had on application at this office.

·         Please note - It is particularly recommended to emigrants to be exceedingly cautious in ascertaining the titles to such lands as they may settle on. Recommendation for lands to the respective Township Agents and Superintendents of settlement in Lower Canada, with routes will be furnished to emigrants (gratis)

·         A. C. Buchanan, Chief Agent Emigrant Department , Quebec , 1st June, 1832

 

·       The churches

·       South Shore of the St. Lawrence 

·       Lévis County

·         About 1770, the villages of Lévis, Charny and Saint-Romuald, located across the mighty St. Lawrence River from Québec City, were renamed Point Levi or/and New Liverpool by the British Authority, the ancient name of Lévis was revived about 1800.

·         Charny (Chaudière)

·         A town located within the township of Lévis within a county of the same name within a township by the name of Saint-Romuald - The region was settled by the Imperial Army as early as the 1760's

·         New Liverpool

·       A reference made of the towns of Charny and Saint Romuald from about 1809 to 1850 - New Liverpool is now Charny - Somehow the expression of New Liverpool was also used by the Anglicans in Québec city in describing church documents dealing with missionary fields -

·         Point Levy (Pointe Levy) / Lauzon Saint Joseph (1794) First organized in 1673, the first Irish or Scottish marriage was performed in 1794 / BAnQ (1679-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1679-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/903.html

·         St-Nicolas Saint Nicolas (1827) Fist organized in 1694, the first recorded Irish marriage was performed in 1827 / BAnQ (1695-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1695-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemon quartier.com/1037.html (New church building)

·         St-Jean Chrysostôme Saint Jean Chrysostôme (1848) First organized in 1830, the parish also described by the Irish as Saint Johns welcomed its first Irish families in 1848 / BAnQ (1830-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1830-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1011.html

·         Lévis - Notre-Dame de Lévis (1853) First organized in 1851, two years later the Irish arrived and settled the parish / BAnQ (1851-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1851-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/899.html

·         St-Romuald - Saint-Romuald of Etchemin (1855) First settled in 1854, the Irish were present in that parish in 1855 / BAnQ (1854-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1854-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1051.html

·        Bellechasse County

·         The territory in present-day County of Bellechasse was first established by French colons about 1678 under the French regime. In 1778, Veronique Ward, daughter of Paul Ward and Veronique Boulet married Jean Baiejon in the church of Saint Charles de Bellechasse In 1787, Mary McLean, daughter of Ignace McLean and of Louise Therrien married Michael Beatty in the Church of Saint Michel de Bellechasse, son of Charles and Angelique Beatty In 1789, Mary McLean, daughter also of Ignace and Catherine McLean, married in the Church of Saint Michel de Bellechasse, Nicholas Boissonnault In 1795 in the Church of Saint Vallier de Bellechasse, Anthony McNeil, son of Ignace and Catherine McNeil married Elisabeth Dannis dit Lapierre These are only a few of the Irish and Scottish pioneers who settled Bellechasse County prior to 1800, many more fellow countrymen would follow.

·         St-Charles de Bellechasse Saint Charles (1778) First organized in 1749, the first Irish / Scottish marriage in 1778 / BAnQ (1749-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1749-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/967.html

·         St-Michel de Bellechasse Saint Michael (Michel) (1787) First organized in 1678, the first Irish / Scottish presence in 1787 / BAnQ (1693-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1693-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1033.html

·         St-Vallier de Bellechasse Saint-Philippe & Saint-Jacques (1795) First organized in 1713, the first Irish or Scottish marriage in 1795 / BAnQ (1713-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1713-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1065.html

·         Beaumont - Saint Stephen (Étienne) (1795) First organized in 1687, the first Irish presence about 1795 / BAnQ (1687-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1687-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/842.html

·         St-Gervais de Bellechasse Saint Georges (1819) First organized in 1780, in 1819 the Irish had arrived / BAnQ (1780-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1780-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1000.html

·         St-Claire de Bellechasse - Sainte-Claire (1824) First organized in 1824, shortly after the first Irish family arrived / BAnQ (1824-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1824-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/969.html

·         St-Anselme de Bellechasse Saint Anselme (1832) First organized in 1830, two years later the immigrants from Ireland were present / BAnQ (1830-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1830-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/953.html

·         Armagh Saint Cajetan de Bellechasse (1854) The town was settled in 1830 The church in 1857, the Irish also arrived in 1830 / BAnQ (1857-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1857-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/838.html

·         St-Malachie de Frampton - Saint Malachie (1857) - First organized as an Irish parish in 1857 / BAnQ (1857-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1857-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1027.html

·         St-Raphael de Bellechasse Saint Raphael (1887) - Church organized in 1851, the Irish were present in 1887 / BAnQ (1851-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1851-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1046.html

·         Buckland Notre-Dame Auxiliatrice (1863) - Bukland was first settled by Anglo Protestants, in 1863 or about Irish Catholics arrived / BAnQ (1857-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1857-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/855.html

·         St-Nérée de Bellechasse - Saint Nérée (1883) - A few Irish families in this parish from about the 1880's / BAnQ (1883-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1883-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1036.html

·         St-Damien de Buckland Saint Damien (1888) Organized in 1883, five years before the arrival of the Irish / BAnQ (1884-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1884-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/974.html

·         Lellis - Saint Camille (1902) - The town of Lellis was first settled by Anglo Protestants, a few Irish families were present from about 1902, perhaps earlier, later on it became a French Canadian village / BAnQ (1902-1940) /Ancestry.ca (1902-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/964.html

·         St-Nazaire de Buckland Saint Nazaire (1903) Buckland was first settled by Anglo Protestant families, most were Anglicans, some were Presbyterians. A few years later Irish Catholic families arrived / BAnQ (1902-1939) / Ancestry.ca (1902-1940) / Church photo, see Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1035.html

·         Dorchester County

·         The region of St-Malachie, originally called East Frampton, owes its development to a great number of Irish and Scottish immigrants who fled Europe devastated by the famine in the beginning of the 19th century. About 1806, several families left Ireland in order to settle in Canada, among these emigrants, a great number would settle in the township of St-Malachie, Frampton and surrounding villages. Few Irish live in Frampton today and the townships resembles countless others in rural Québec. Save for the graveyards. Their tombstones recall a past built and sustained by Irish families names such as ONeill, Doyle, Fitzgerald, Redmond, Kelly, OConnell, Corrigan, Dillon, Cullen, Kennedy, Kilcullen, Kinsella, Lonergan, Lyons, OFarrell, Quigley and many others.

·         East Frampton - The Small Parish (La petite paroisse) (also described in early documents as Saint Edmond of Frampton (1822) Organized for the early Irish emigrants. The church no longer exist The town of Frampton was recommended to Irish emigrants arriving at the Port of Québec as being a choice location for Irish families wishing to settle as farmers / BAnQ no known surviving church registers / Ancestry.ca nothing / Church photo, nothing

·         St. Claire of Dorchester Sainte Claire (1824) Organized I believe for Irish settlers in 1824 / BAnQ (1824-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1824-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/969.html

·         St-Anselme de Dorchester Saint Anselme (1830) Organized in 1830, a minor Irish presence in this parish / BAnQ (1830-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1830-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/953.html

·         Frampton - Saint-Edward of Frampton (1829) - An Irish parish from the beginning / BAnQ (1829-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1829-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier  www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/875.html

·         St. Margaret of Dorchester Sainte Marguerite (1831) - This parish appears to have been the home of a substantial number of Irish families at one point in time / BAnQ (1840-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1840-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1029.html

·         St-Isidore de Dorchester Saint Isidore (1834) - A minor role at best in regard to Irish content / BAnQ (1834-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1834-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1009.html

·         St. Malachie of Frampton Sainte Malachie (1841) A leading Irish parish in Dorchester county / BAnQ (1857-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1857-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1027.html

·         St-Bernard de Dorchester Saint Bernard (1844) Organized in 1824, from 1844 this parish had a very minor role in regard to Irish families within the church registers / BAnQ (1844-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1844-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/962.html

·         Ste-Hénédine de Dorchester - Sainte Hénédine (1852) - A few Irish families can be found among its registers / BAnQ (1852-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1852-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1003.html

·         Cranbourne / St-Odilon de Dorchester Saint Odillon  (1857) - Cranbourne was home to an Anglican Mission and a Catholic church, the latter at the beginning was an Irish church / BAnQ (1883-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1883-1940)

·         Ste-Justine de Dorchester Sainte Justine (1865) - A minor Irish church / BAnQ (1877-1900) / Ancestry.ca nothing / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1019.html

·         Lake (Lac) Etchemin Sainte-Germaine (1867) - A fair number of Irish families had their children baptized or married in this parish / BAnQ (1867-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1867-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/886.html

·         Standon Saint Leon of Standon (1872) - The Anglicans were present, the Irish were present in this village from the beginning / BAnQ (1872-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1872-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1071.html

·         St-Prosper de Dorchester Saint Prosper (1890) - A small presence of a few Irish families within church registers / BAnQ (1890-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1890-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1045.html

·         Scott Junction - Saint Maxime (1892) - Anglicans were present, Irish families were present / BAnQ (1892-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1892-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemon quartier.com/1068.html

·         Watford - Sainte Rose (1894) - The Anglicans were present, the Irish were present / BAnQ (1894-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1894-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1052.html

·         Buckland - Saint Nazaire (1902) - First settled as an Anglo Protestant town, mostly Anglican families. A minor role at best in the life of Irish families of the county / BAnQ (1902-1939) / Ancestry.ca (1902-1939) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1035.html

·         St-Cyprien de Dorchester - Saint Cyprien (1919) To my knowledge, not an Irish region, a few Irish church registers, very few / BAnQ (1916-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1916-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/973.html

·         Lotbinière County

·         The Seigniory of Lotbinière begins at the St. Lawrence River, south of Québec City and stretches southeastward to the border of Mégantic County. It is mainly rural. Of the 22 Catholic parishes established since the days of the seigneurial system, Irish settlements were mainly confined to areas along Gosford Road in the southern parishes of Saint-Sylvestre, Sainte-Agathe, Saint-Gilles (Giles), Saint-Patrick of Beaurivage and the parishes, which bordered with Mégantic County. In the 1820s the southern parishes received a large contingent of Irish Catholics who were assigned 50-acre lots as tenant farmers, interspersed with French and Scottish farmers The Protestants of Lotbinière were few in comparison to the Catholics. The Protestant presence in Lotbinière began in 1831 with preaching-points established in various villages located along Craig Road by Presbyterian, Wesleyan Methodist and Anglican Missionaries. The Irish Protestants of the region, mostly lived in nearby Mégantic County to the west, in regions referred to at the time as Leeds, Inverness, Kinnears Mills, Ireland, most of them, located along the famous Craigs Road.

·         Craig and Gosford Roads The Governor of Lower Canada Sir James Henry Craig, issued a decree in 1810 for the construction of a road between St. Gilles and Richmond, a distance of 75 miles In 1838, Governor Archibald Acheson, Count of Gosford orders the construction of a second road, this one between Ste. Agathe and Sherbrooke.

·         Seigniory of St-Croix of Beaurivage Originally a seigniory from the Seigniory of Beaurivage. Now the Municipality of Ste-Croix

·         New Argyle of the Seigniory of Sainte Croix (Early 1820s) The community no longer exist but was mentioned in 1832 in documents issued by the Government of Lower Canada, as being a primary destination of Irish homesteaders with the likes of Frampton, St. Giles, New Ireland, Tewksbury, Stoneham, Valcartier, Jacques Cartier, Deschambault, Portneuf, Brandon, Kilkenny, Rawdon, Kildare, Sherbrooke, Chambly, Three Rivers and the Eastern Townships.

·         St-Sylvestre de Lotbinière Saint Sylvestre (1820) - The region of St. Sylvestre, was first settled by Irish emigrants about 1820 - The church opened in 1828 - Also present in this village were Anglicans, Presbyterians, Methodists / BAnQ (1829-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1829-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1059.html

·         Mill Range of Lotbinière (1821) Settled by Irish settlers in the early 1820s The hamlet no longer exist under the name of Mill Range, the region is now referred to as Route du Moulin.

·         Parkhurst (1825) A former small Irish hamlet settled prior to 1825, on the Craig Road in St. Sylvestre Parish - Now part of the Municipality of St. Patrick (St-Patrice)

·         St. John of Lotbinière (1825) Settled in the mid 1820s by Irish settlers The region, no longer exist as such or at least described as such.

·         Falls of Lotbinière (1826) Settled by Irish and French settlers in the mid 1820s No longer referred to as such, it is now described as Rang des Chutes

·         St. David of Lotbinière (1827) Settled in the 1820s by Irish emigrants No longer referred to under this name.

·         St. Andrew of Lotbinière (1828) Settled by Irish emigrants in the late 1820s No longer exist as an entity.

·         St. Peter of Lotbinière (1829) - Settled by Irish emigrants in the late 1820s or early 1830s No longer exist as a hamlet.

·         Belfast of Lotbinière (1829) Settled in the late 1820s by Northern Ireland Protestant Irish No longer exist as such.

·         St. Joseph of Lotbinière (1829) Settled in the late 1820s by Irish and French settlers No longer exist as a gathering place or at least under this name.

·         St. Giles of Lotbinière Saint-Gilles (Giles) (1829) Also described as St. Giles, this community was highly recommended in 1832 to Irish emigrants arriving at the Port of Québec by the Port Authority management - Also present in this village was an Anglican church from 1840 and 1893 and a Presbyterian church from 1857 to 1890 / BAnQ (1830-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1830-1041) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1002.html

·         Ste-Catherine of Lotbinière (1830) Settled by French and Irish settlers in the early 1830s The hamlet, no longer exist

·         New Armagh of Lotbinière (1830) A former settlement on the Armagh Range of St. Sylvestre where the range road crosses the Filkar River. Was part of St. Sylvestre Parish. It is now part of the municipality of Ste-Agathe

·         St. Charles of Lotbinière (1831) Settled by Irish emigrants in the early 1830s No longer referred to as such, at least not under that name.

·         Fermanagh of Lotbinière (1833) Settled in the early 1830s by Irish emigrants No longer exist under that name, or at least referred to as such.

·         Monaghan of Lotbinière (1835) Settled in the 1830s by Irish emigrants No longer described as such.

·         St. Paul of Lotbinière (1835) Settled by Irish farmers in 1835 or about No longer exist under that name.

·         Ste-Agathe de Lotbinière Sainte Agathe (1853) Still Irish in part to this day A region which was also referred to as The Falls of Ste-Agathe / BAnQ (1857-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1857-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/946.html

·         Saint Patrice de Beaurivage Saint Patrick (1871) - A leading Irish village in Lotbinière / BAnQ (1871-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1871-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1039.html

·         St. Edouard de Lotbinière Saint Edward (1863) An Irish village in part of the 1860's / BAnQ (1863-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1863-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/975.html

·         Dosquet de Lotbinière - Saint Octave (1912) A  small Irish presence in the region / BAnQ (1913-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1913-1941) / Church photo, see Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/872.html (new church building)

·        Beauce County

·         About 1821 the first Irish emigrants would settle in the parish of Sainte-Marie. From 1855 onwards, there was a steady and heavy outward migration toward Saint-George(s) to the east and to other parishes located along the Valley of the Chaudière River toward the State of Maine. The soil was fertile and well drained and ideal for small dairy farms. The strong Irish presence of the 1850s in this region is still felt to this day with descendants within the French community with Irish surnames or Irish ancestors.

·          Sainte-Marie de Beauce Sainte Marie (1806) - The town was settled in 1745 The parish was first settled by Irish emigrants in 1806 - The church had opened in 1745 under the French regime / BAnQ (1745-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1745-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1030.html

·         Saint Joseph de Beauce Saint Joseph (1826) First settled by the French in 1740, the Irish had arrived in 1826 / BAnQ (1738-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1738-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1016.html

·         Beauceville Saint-Francois dAssise (1831) Organized in 1765, in 1831 the Irish were present / BAnQ (1765-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1765-1940) / Church photo, see Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/841.html

·         Saint-Georges de Beauce Saint Georges (1841) First organized in 1841, a year later the Irish were present - The largest city in the county of Beauce was also a destination of many Irish settlers. St. Georges, being located close to the U.S. Border at the State of Maine, became a primary crossing-point of Irish and French Canadian citizens who were searching for a better life in the New England states / BAnQ (1841-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1841-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/999.html

·         Linière de Beauce - Saint-Elzear de Beauce (1835) Linière, also had a Protestant presence about the same time period, mostly Anglicans / BAnQ (1846-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1846-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/976.html

·         St-Frédéric Saint Frédéric (1855) First organized in 1852, the Irish were members of the community a few years later, few in numbers / BAnQ (1852-1941) / Ancestry.ca (1852-1941) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/996.html

·         West Broughton  - Saint Peter (Pierre) (1855) Organized in part by Irish parishioners / BAnQ (1877-1900) / Ancestry.ca (1877-1900) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leséglisesdemonquartier.com/1043.html

·         St-Séverin Saint Séverin (1879) Organized in 1872, seven years later a few Irish families were present / BAnQ (1872-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1872-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1955.html

·         Tring - Saint Éphrem (1866)- First settled by Anglo Protestants, Anglicans mostly, Irish Catholics and French Canadian families were also present from the 1860's onwards / BAnQ (1866-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1866-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/978.html

·         East Broughton Sacred Heart of Jesus (Sacré Coeur de Jésus) (1871) - A Anglo Protestant village, mostly Anglicans when first settled, Irish Catholics, French Canadians settled the region from about the 1860's onwards / BAnQ (1871-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1871-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/873.html

·         Shenley - Saint Honoré (1874) - First settled by Anglo Protestants. Irish Catholics and French Canadians arrived in the region in the 1860's or about / BAnQ (1873-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1873-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1007.html

·         Kennebec / Linière Saint Côme (1881) First settled about 1872 by Protestant families, mostly Anglicans, this border town was the home of a small number of Irish families, some stayed a generation or two, some only a few years, some worked in the U.S.A. and resided in Canada. Many Irish families of this region eventually moved to the U.S.A., never to returned / BAnQ (1871-1940) / Ancestry.ca (1871-1940) / Church photo, see; Les églises de mon quartier www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/971.html

·         Selected Original Sources dealing with A.C. Buchanan

·         Robert John Grace The Irish in Quebec

·         “Third Report from the Select Committee on Emigration from the United Kingdom” – Evidence of A.C. Buchanan

·         A.C. Buchanan “Annual Report on Emigration for 1850”

·         “First Report from the Select Committee on Emigration of 1826 by A.C. Buchanan

·         For a detailed listing of various other sources on the Irish in Quebec City and A.C. Buchanan, refer to a document entitled “Irish Immigration and Settlement in a Catholic City, 1842-1861 by Robert J. Grace” This 32 pages document is also part of the QFHS REF #GS-150.9 G3 binders, the latter dealing with the Irish of Quebec, where they lived, their churches, their stories.

·        Repositories

·         Repositories quoted in this research guide include;

·         BAnQ - Archives nationales du Québec

·         Ancestry.ca - Canadian division of Ancestry.com

·         QFHS - Drouin Direct - Although not indicated as such, all church registers listed under BAnQ or Ancestry.ca are available at the QFHS Library under the Drouin Direct offering.

·         Compiled by Jacques Gagné [email protected]

·         Special contribution: Cecilia Karwowski